Coloquinte’s architecture

As I said in the previous post, Coloquinte will be built around an analytical placement algorithm alternating between convex placement optimization and cell spreading: it is one of the most efficient methods published so far.

My early prototypes worked, but the spreading algorithm was a bit too simple to cope with the benchmarks. More importantly, they lacked a clean architecture.

The new goal is to work well on a large class of circuits and the tool should be more modular. It is meant to interface loosely with Paris 6 university’s tools: the Coriolis toolchain from the Lip6 laboratory, where I work part-time from next week, and its database Hurricane.

Overall architecture

It should be splitted between 3 independent blocks that transform the Hurricane representation: the global placer, the legalizer and the detailed placer. In order to keep control over the optimization passes applied, each tool is scriptable in Python. This is particularly important for the global placer, where everything is tunable from the spreading schedule to the net models.

The tools interface through Hurricane. Each tool is a collection of C++ modules controlled by a Python script
The tools interface through Hurricane. Each tool is a collection of C++ modules controlled by a Python script

The global placer

The global placer uses a technique known as quadratic placement where the wires are modelled as elastic springs: this yields a sparse linear system, which can be solved approximately in linearithmic time. It is not as artificial as it seems: it is in fact very close to Newton’s method for optimization.
This quadratic placement alternates with a spreading phase, whose result is fed back to “anchor” the next placement iteration. Everything is tunable: I intend to let the user chose the net model, the legalization algorithm and how strong the cells are pulled toward the legal position. Each of these components gets a Python interface so that the whole optimization is scriptable.

You may note that I include “Companion tools” that could interface with the global placer: such tools are necessary when optimizing for complex objectives. I build Coloquinte so that it can cope with other tools with minor modifications in case we want to extend it.

Post-processing

The detailed placer and legalizer need not as much controllability, but I am going to use the same architecture nonetheless: the more the designer can control, the better the result. Ideally, we would try multiple combinations of the optimization passes to obtain the best tradeoffs: they can be distributed as several Python scripts, possibly completely different.

Today, I begin to program the legalizer. Since this algorithm is completely new, I am probably not going to talk about it anytime soon, but I have a (partially) new one for detailed placement that I am going to present in the next post.

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